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September 2014
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Syndication

If you aren't thrilled about the ability to quickly query huge datasets about whatever questions strike your fancy, please listen to this podcast.

This week's guest, Kalev Leetaru, is the [company]Yahoo[/company] Fellow in Residence of International Values, Communications Technology & the Global Internet at the Institute for the Study of Diplomacy in the Edmund A. Walsh School of Foreign Service at Georgetown University. Phew. More to the point, Leetaru is pushing the Global Database of Events, Languages, and Tones. Also known as GDELT, this project has taken more than 250 million historical data points from the past 35 years to try to determine patterns between, say, the current unrest in Ukraine and historical events.

If the past is prologue, this is a pretty fabulous tool to have at your disposal. Which it now is, since [company]Google[/company] has made the dataset available via its cloud platform. Leetaru is clearly jazzed about the possibilities here -- being able to fire off questions fast and furious against a huge data set is certainly a change from the not-so-distant past when you had to queue up for access to government- owned supercomputers. And wait.

Now, with huge datasets and the compute power to crunch them readily available, it's hard not to catch his enthusiasm. What's truly exciting about this is the ability even lay researchers have to follow up on tangents that crop up during their work. They might end up being wild goose chases. Or result in valuable insights. You can't know until you pursue them. And GDELT now enables that pursuit.

But first, in an abbreviated intro, Derrick Harris and I highlight news of the week, including [company]VMware[/company] & Friends' new data center appliance, [company]Google's[/company] acquisition of Zync and a few other topics.

Kalev Leetaru
Kalev Leetaru

 

 

Direct download: GIGAOM_PODCAST_STRUCTURE_SHOW_082714.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 7:00 AM

The Chrome Remote Desktop client can help get around some of the limitations of a Chromebook: Just connect to and control a Windows or Mac PC. What you don't have -- or want -- that remote computer though? Enter Citrix and VMWare, which both announced virtual desktop support for Chromebooks this week. It's another strategy for Google to win the battle over traditional computing, even if its aimed mostly at enterprises.

On this week's podcast, we discuss the timing of this development (which follows last week's low-cost Windows laptop news) and share an early look at a way to send commands directly to an Android device from the Chrome browser or a Chromebook. There's new hardware to discuss too: Acer is in the Chromebox game.

 

Direct download: GIGAOM_CHROME_SHOW_082614.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 7:00 AM

It's late summer, and most of the tech world is devoid of actual news, but when it comes to the internet of things we have a new smart home hub to discuss in the Peq and a guest who can help explain some of the many protocols associated with the industrial internet. James Kirkland, the Chief Architect for Intelligent Systems and the Internet of Things at Red Hat. joined me to talk about automating trains, middleware for the internet of things and the pros and cons of different protocols from MQTT to DDS.

Before I got too industrial, Kevin Tofel and I talked about my demo of the Peq system (I'm setting up the review unit this week) and an Android Wear app that lets you control your phone with gestures (if you have a smart watch that runs Android Wear). We also talked about how to build apps and controls for shared devices like lights and thermostats, in an environment that normally thinks about building apps for a personal device (the smart phone). Enjoy. There's something for everyone in this week's show.

Host: Stacey Higginbotham
Guests: Kevin Tofel and James Kirkland, the Chief Architect for Intelligent Systems and the Internet of Things at Red Hat

  • My peek at Peq, a home hub with a pretty interface
  • Check out Kiwi, an app that turns your gestures into commands
  • How do you build interfaces for shared devices?
  • Could the industrial internet prevent train derailments?
  • A breakdown of industrial protocols and when to use what
Direct download: INTERNET_OF_THINGS_PODCAST_8-25-14.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 7:00 AM

Most observers would say Box is in a tough spot.  MicrosoftGoogle and now Amazon have barged onto its turf of business-focused file sync, share and management. That's got to be worrisome even if some of those services aren't as slick as Box's.

This week's guest, [company]Box[/company] co-founder and CEO Aaron Levie, acknowledges the concern, but maintains that Box's ability to work across operating systems, devices and applications, makes it more able to meet user requirements -- what a concept -- than the big platform guys that have other agendas -- like locking users into using more of their stuff. The API economy makes it possible for  more focused and innovative companies to build products that integrate with other applications users want. We also ask what's up with the Box IPO. (Hey, it's our job.)

Box CEO Aaron Levie
Box CEO Aaron Levie

 

Levie also cues up BoxWorks 2014 coming up in a few weeks starts in a segment that starts at around minute 9. But if you want to hear about former Microsoft CEO (and director) Steve Ballmer's new gig as Clippers owner or why [company]Google[/company] bought image recognition specialist Jetpac or  VMware's product naming travails, listen to the whole shebang.

Direct download: 082014_01-AudioMp3.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 7:00 AM

Direct download: 081914_01-AudioMp3.mp3
Category:Technology -- posted at: 12:08 PM

Cellular connections are expensive and the plans aren't always conducive to connecting 1,000 devices in a go, but that is changing argues Eran Eshed, Co-Founder and VP of Marketing & Business Development, Altair Semiconductor in this week's podcast. Eshed makes a case for cellular as a real answer to connectivity for the internet of things, especially for industrial customers. I'm not sure I'm convinced, but he did address range issues, the cost of the modems inside devices and more.

Kevin Tofel and I also discussed what was a busy week in smart home hubs with Samsung buying SmartThings for a reported $200 million, the launch of Best Buy's home hub (a collaboration between the retailer and a startup selling a service called Peq) and the news that Home Depot is putting its considerable muscle behind the Wink platform. We also discuss the new white Philips LED connected bulbs and their $30 price tag, which means that the price of connected bulbs is coming down. So listen up to see how Kevin views the Samsung buy of SmartThings, the thought of four home platforms and more.

Host: Stacey Higginbotham
Guests: Kevin Tofel and Eran Eshed, Co-Founder and VP of Marketing & Business Development, Altair Semiconductor

  • Kevin thinks Samsung is likely to keep SmartThings open so isn't worried
  • Maybe the smart home can handle a few big closed systems
  • Home Depot's push for Wink makes sense for it and the consumer
  • Cellular may be expensive, but carriers are making it much cheaper with 4G-only service
  • The industrial internet isn't going to rely on Wi-Fi
Direct download: 081814_01-AudioMp3.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 7:00 AM

When he quit his paying job and needed a new gig, Chris Aker started [company]Linode[/company] in 2003, well before any of the public cloud providers showed up. And Linode, a conflation of "Linux" and "node,"  which he initially ran out of his bedroom, became an early fan favorite among developers needing an easy way to create and run workloads. Here he talks about why he's not wild about Linode being characterized as a virtual private server company as opposed to a cloud provider, which he calls a distinction without a real difference except for marketing purposes.

Linode, he said, makes it easier for customres to buy all-in-one easy to consume nodes -- with bandwidth etc included. In April Linode garnered $45 million in new funding to fund a pretty impressive infrastructure overhaul including new SSD drives, doubled RAM capacity, the latest Intel chips and 40GB networking.

Check out our chat to learn why The Onion is a great customer for Linode, but also a scary one.

Linode Founder Chris Aker.
Linode Founder Chris Aker.

Derrick Harris and I also go off on a tangent about the use (and potential abuse) of data analytics by major sports franchises and why we're happy that Yahoo is serious about R&D with its revitalized Yahoo Labs but how it better be very, very careful not to screw up [company]Yahoo[/company] Finance. But if it could combone Flickr photo and perhaps video search with that dashboard, we would be very, very happy. (Hint hint.)

 

So check out this week's show.

SHOW NOTES

Hosts: Barb Darrow and Derrick Harris

Direct download: 081314_02-audio.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 6:56 AM

Maybe it's time for us to grow up a bit and recognize that two or three companies that have the ability to invest in creating an awesome user experience will control the destiny of the consumer-oriented internet of things. The experience won't be built on one standard as we hope. Of course, the companies will provide that platform are still up in the air, according to Tom Coates, the co-founder of stealthy startup Product Club and the man behind the @HouseofCoates Twitter account.

In this week's podcast he and I discuss what the above topic, as well as what a device that helps make the smart home into a mainstream desire could look like. He also tells me why we're no closer to any rules about the use of our personal data. Many of his conclusions mirror our own at the show; so far the internet of things is pretty clunky for mainstream users. Meanwhile, my colleague Kevin Tofel and I talk about the Hue tap light switchPhilips teaming up with Accenture to use consumer connected devices to make it easier for patients with ALS to communicate, and a primer on Android Fit and Android Wear.

Listen up, and if you like the podcast, make sure you send Coates a friendly tweet. He says he never gets those.

Host: Stacey Higginbotham
Guests: Kevin Tofel and Tom Coates of Product Club

  • That clicking noise you hear is our initial take on the Hue tap wall switch (pictured above)
  • How we could use wearables, sensors and connected devices to help people with certain diseases communicate
  • Why the internet won't be open like the web
  • No one is using the internet of things, so no one cares yet about their data
  • Connected devices will come, but we need a magical device or service to make consumers love them
Direct download: 081114_01-audio.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 6:59 AM

Brad Feld just came out and said what some still deem unthinkable: Amazon(s amzn) Web Services is not always the lowest cost provider. Not since Google(s goog) and Microsoft(s msft) hit the public cloud arena like gale force winds. And not for many startups that have hit a certain monthly IT spend -- $200,000? -- and might be better off looking at other options, including bare metal or in-house servers.

Still, many users won't care. The CIA, after all, went with AWS even after it was underbid by IBM(s ibm) on that cloud contract. But being the low-cost provider is part of Amazon's DNA and acting in ways contrary to that trait causes problems for it, Feld noted.

Feld, who is managing director for The Foundry Group and co-founder of TechStars, blogged about this last week -- referencing some of Gigaom's coverage of Amazon's challenges -- and talks more about the topic on this week's show.

Before you get all riled up, no one is disrespecting what Amazon -- which blazed the public cloud category and churns out new services at a fast clip -- has accomplished. But markets change and this competitive landscape is most certainly shifting. Feld's a fun guy to talk to, so make sure to listen up to at least about minute 10 if you're in a hurry.

Derrick Harris and I also discuss the evils of shelfware in the cloud era and Docker's upcoming funding round. I mean, is it really any surprise that this company is drawing huge interest (and potentially big VC dollars)?

Foundry Group's Brad Feld
Foundry Group's Brad Feld

SHOW NOTES

Hosts: Barb Darrow and Derrick Harris

Direct download: 080614_01_01-AudioMp3.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 10:37 PM

Direct download: Chrome_Show-08072014.mp3
Category:Technology -- posted at: 2:24 PM